Year 3 Go on a Galactic Adventure

Clifton School and Nursery

Year 3 Go on a Galactic Adventure

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This term Year 3 have been exploring the wonders of the universe. The children have travelled through our solar system, past our planets and far into the galaxy, launched rockets and defied gravity. Then came the children's next challenge...to become the next generation of astronauts.

As part of their training we travelled to Eureka for a Space Crew workshop. On arrival, the future space cadets were warmly greeted by two friendly astronauts. As they entered the Space Crew workshop they were welcomed with a message from the one and only Tim Peake! Inspired by his advice, the children began their training.

First of all, what does it take to launch a rocket into space? We watched with excitement as the astronauts demonstrated how oxygen, fuel and heat create BLAST OFF and a large bang! The children were then tasked with their first experiment. They had to use their communication, mathematical, English and team working skills to control a robot arm. Not as easy as it looks.

IMG 8065They then had to investigate two of the problems facing astronauts in space; floating liquids and the effects of a vacuum. First, the children worked in teams to investigate the absorbency of three materials, to find out which would best absorb the liquid (a problem which faces astronauts when they need the toilet in their spacesuits!) The children then used marshmallows to help them to see how a vacuum can affect the human body. The air pressure in space is extremely low, in fact it’s almost zero. They learnt how a spacesuit protects astronauts from these potentially dangerous effects of space.

Our little astronauts had an amazing day using their problem solving and teamwork skills to investigate the problems facing space travel.

Amara, one of the year 3 pupils, said: “I loved it! I enjoyed seeing the marshmallows in a vacuum get smaller and bigger.”. Beth, another of the pupils who visited, told us: “It surprised me how challenging it was to control a robotic arm. It was hard picking up the hexagonal prism.”.

Thanks to Rebecca Riley for this report